Best Energy Gels for Cycling

Best Energy Gels for Cycling, Hiking, Triathlon, Running 2020

It’s an important question, are there any best energy gels for cycling, hiking, triathlon and running consumer reports 2020.

Enjoy a natural pick-me-up for your endurance endeavors with energy gels packed with nothing but the good stuff.

Today we are going to come with a list of top rated high quality energy gels, which will keep you hydrated while you do your best.

Best Energy Gels

  1. Veloforte Tempo
  2. 33Fuel Chia Energy Gel
  3. One Pro Nutrition Energy Gel
  4. Ote Apple Energy Gel
  5. Hüma Chia Energy Gel
  6. Honey Stinger Organic Energy Gels
  7. Spring Energy Canaberry

Best Energy Gels for Running

Veloforte Tempo

An energizing blend to perk up your palate as you workout. Veloforte’s range of refreshingly simple endurance products are all inspired by Panforte: an Italian dessert made from a blend of fruits, nuts and spices. You won’t find much else in any of Veloforte’s products, and they’re all the better for it.

There are several gels to choose from, but the Tempo tops our list. Made from dates, lemon and ginger, and loaded with natural electrolytes from date nectar, maple syrup and unrefined brown rice syrup, each 110-calorie sachet makes mid-run or ride fueling a breeze. Top marks, if you are playing golf.

Best Energy Gels for Cycling

33Fuel Chia Energy Gel

Made with just four natural ingredients and packing a mighty punch. 33Fuel’s original Energy Gel contains nothing but organic chia seeds, coconut palm sugar, organic vanilla, and Himalayan pink salt.

The result is an optimum blend of carbs, fats and antioxidants that combine to fight fatigue, without the peaks and troughs of more artificial products. To use, open the cap, low to inflate, fill with your liquid of choice (use coffee for an added boost) and shake.

Best Energy Gels for Hiking

One Pro Nutrition Energy Gel

Each gel provides 22g of carbohydrate and 400mg of BCAA’s which support muscle mass and performance. These provide a welcome boost when you’re flagging and although there’s a couple of not-so-natural names on the ingredients list, in the main this is a far cleaner gel than most on the market. Its real-fruit flavoring makes it easy to stomach on the go, while the added BCAAs encourage tired muscles to stick at it.

Best Energy Gels for Triathlon

Ote Apple Energy Gel

Contains real fruit juice concentrate in an easy to consume, almost liquid-like consistency. OTE’s extensive testing process means all its products are athlete-approved and proven to do the job. The brand’s new Apple Energy Gel tastes pretty good, but it’s the consistency that stands out: there’s none of the thick gooeyness of some gels, making it easy to chug one back on the move without fear of a sickly aftertaste.

Hüma Chia Energy Gel

Fruit Puree. Chia Seeds. Brown Rice Syrup. You don’t need a PhD to pronounce the ingredients in Hüma Gel. Hüma was inspired by the endurance endeavors of the Tarahumara, a tribe of Mexican Indians who regularly run hundreds of miles at a time, fueled by chia.

There’s no promises these gels will turn you into an ultra marathoner overnight, but the
simple ingredients and easy-to-gulp texture are a tonic for tired legs.

Honey Stinger Organic Energy Gels

Jam-packed with the nutritional goodness of honey, this gel offers a rapid absorption of carbohydrate energy. A big hitter in the world of natural energy gels, Honey Stinger has been around for a while, but now it’s got a range of Organic Gels that contain nothing but the good stuff. The Fruit Smoothie flavor gets our vote, powered predominantly by organic tapioca syrup and honey that tastes as good as anything we’ve tried.

Spring Energy Canaberry

A balanced composition of carbohydrates without the negative effects of sugar and/or maltodextrin overload. Designed in collaboration with pro ultra runner Sage Canaday – who knows a thing or two about long-distance fueling – these Canaberry gels are made up of a balanced blend of natural carbohydrates to provide energy while preventing sugar crashes. The taste leaves a little to be desired, but there’s no faulting the formula.

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