Best Running Watches Under $100

Best Running Watches Under $100 For Beginners 2020

Well running folks here are the best running watches under 100 dollars for beginners in 2020.

Do we need to be tied to tech? These two runners fight their corners.

Best Running Watches Under $100

TicWatch Pro 4G/LTE

What’s cool about this watch is its standalone connectivity to Vodafone UK’s 4G network, using a preloaded SIM.

In short, you don’t have to carry your smartphone on your run! You can simply strap it on and let it track your every movement.

It’s rammed with tech, like Google Pay, meaning you don’t even have to carry cash to pay for that bottle of drink you suddenly need.

Features:

  • 1GB memory
  • GPS connectivity
  • Google Pay
  • IP68 waterproof rating
  • Improved HR sensor
  • 4G connection
  • Cloud sync

Best Running Watches For Beginners

Diesel On Fadelite

Diesel’s new watch packs form and function. An innovative new Globe dial features a rotating globe that users can manipulate with just a touch.

Using the moving globe, two additional time zones can be shown on the dial. It is suitably packed with tech that includes Wear OS by Google.

It also features weather effects – interactive dial animations that show a range of real-time weather conditions.

Features:

  • Auto-Installed Apps
  • Weather effects
  • Google Fit
  • Google Pay
  • GPS Tracking
  • HR tracking
  • Customisable watch faces

Suunto 7

This boasts new vivid, full-colour offline outdoor maps, plus wrist-based control of music playlists for convenience on the go. There are 70+ sport modes.

Battery life will support a full day of active smartwatch use and still have enough juice left for your daily workout, including accurate exercise measurement with wrist-based heart rate tracking, barometer for elevation readings, and training insights.

Features:

  • GPS
  • Google Pay
  • Google Fit
  • Water resistant to 50 metres
  • Strava connection
  • App store

Pros and Cons of having running watches

Pros

Now into that structured you aim training to run and marathon, get a decent you have running to look watch!” a good friend told me eight years ago.

Gifting all his old watches, he threw me down the rabbit hole. My running life has made many twists and turns and a watch always played an important part in it.

I had my phase of over quantification, grew mad at the bad accuracy of instant pace from GPS and got a foot pod to get my cadence to a reasonable 180 strikes per minute.

I loved to analyses my GPX tracks to answer the question, “where the heck did I go wrong?” after bushwhacking my way back home.

Over the years, and several watch generations, I gave my watches a central role in my running and at some point I got involved with field-testing for both my mileage and the terrain around my home, which is apparently very challenging for GPS devices.

I frequently run with up to six watches – three on each arm – to produce comparable recordings over different models and firmware.

It is a good motivational boost for my running as it gives the miles an additional purpose.

The more the watches on my arm belong to my running, the more I use them purposefully.

Not having them distract me from being out there, getting to myself, not kicking me every run just to have a presentable average pace in the workout summary.

Not having them tell me how I should feel in the moment.

And of course, they bring me home when I once again curiously run off into the unknown, or lead me through a daylong journey off the beaten track.

Cons

Matt Butler is a keen runner who is assistant sports editor of the i newspaper.

It running was in the with middle technology of a forest wasn’t when for me. I realized A male that voice in a generic mid-Atlantic accent told me with the insincerity of a train announcement apology that I had run “13 kilo metres.

This is your longest run”. It had come from my phone – or more specifically the app that had come with my phone.

I had turned it on as a trial (after all, some of the greatest runners swear by their hi-tech gadgets) and it had told me at one kilometre intervals how far I had gone, in the same patronizing, bloodless tone.

All it did was ruin the fun of being in the woods. Switching him off was immensely satisfying on so many levels.

There was no need for my run to be measured – after all, I had a normal watch to tell me when I ought to have turned around and headed for home.

The repetitive announcements were merely stress-inducing. There is another layer to my aversion to running with a smart-lace watch or phone.

Well type 1 diabetes and have a blood-glucose monitor and substitute pancreas constantly strapped to me.

I am measured 24 hours a day – the last thing I want is yet another electronic informant, silently judging me. While uploading my distance, pace and heartbeat to the ether.

There’s a place for heart-rate monitors, wrist worn navigation aids and satellite-driven odometers tailor-made for online bragging, but it isn’t anywhere near me.

I run to escape the clogged-up, incrementally measured, constantly monitored nature of daily life, not to add to it.

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